Bloodshot (2020)

DAVE WILSON

Bil’s rating (out of 5): BB.5

USA, 2020. , , , , , , , , , . Story by , Screenplay by Jeff Wadlow, , based on the Valiant comic book by , , . Cinematography by . Produced by , , , . Music by . Production Design by . Costume Design by . Film Editing by .

Vin Diesel is enjoying a beautiful, romantic life with his gorgeous wife when the both of them are taken hostage by a villain and she is killed before his eyes.  He is shot in the head, which should be game over except that it leads to the opening credits, after which he wakes up in a science lab and is told that he has been put back together as part of a program to create immortal supersoldiers.  His blood is now teeming with nano-robots that heal him whenever he is wounded thanks to the genius of mad scientist Guy Pearce, who has created a magnificent technology that has restored everyone around him to full functionality, from his own missing arm to ‘s missing legs and ‘s inability to breathe through her own lungs.  Memory flashbacks kick in and Diesel remembers his personal tragedy, breaking out of the laboratory compound and heading towards the man who killed his wife.  After exacting his revenge, he comes back ready for to do Pearce’s bidding, which is where the audience is treated to a surprise twist: everything is not exactly as it seems, but I don’t want to ruin it for you.  Once Diesel puts it together that he’s the pawn in someone else’s bid to take advantage of the system, he begins to fight back against the people that he believed were his team, which is when the plot that has been mashing up Frankenstein and Robocop starts to go towards Memento and Le Samourai.  Unlike all of those stories, however, this one only has an imaginative premise, the execution is dull and Diesel is, as always, terrified to show us that he might ever have a good time doing anything.  Heughan is playing an idea of an American action figure that is never convincing, and director Dave Wilson wastes the wonders of a great deal of terrific visual effects in telling a story whose preposterous concept should have made for something far more indulgent than what we have here.

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