My Old Addiction

Movie Reviews By Bil Antoniou

John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum (2019)

CHAD STAHELSKI

Bil’s rating (out of 5): BBB.5USA, 2019, , , Story by , Screenplay by Derek Kolstad, , , , based on characters created by Derek Kolstad.  Cinematography by Produced by , Music by , Production Design by Costume Design by Film Editing by .

Keanu Reeves and Anjelica Huston in John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

Having just been ex-communicated from the international network of fancy assassins, with their steampunk headquarters teeming with rotary phones and tattoed girls updating chalkboards, John Wick (Keanu Reeves) is now on the run, getting some quick help for a serious injury before going on a quest to save his own life. Visiting old acquaintances, cashing in some favours and traveling as far as Casablanca, Wick traverses the usual settings of old world hotels and neon-lit alleyways destroying everyone in his path, climbing up the ranks of his shadowy organization looking to get right with the “high table” that controls it all. After a disappointing second act that continued the adventures of the excellent original, this third chapter is a refreshing bit of bloody whimsy, ridiculously expanding the character’s universe to include such magical figures as Anjelica Huston as an underworld matriarch and Halle Berry as his jaded contact living in the middle east with her vicious guard dogs.  Some might be disappointed by what they see as Sean Connery Bond threatening to go Roger Moore, but for the most part it gets more fun the more elaborately it spins its yarn, relying a bit less on endless one-on-one combat (though don’t worry, there’s plenty of carnage) and leaving more of an impression of its colourful cinematography and memorable cast. A subplot involving Asia Kate Dillon as an adjudicator following Wick’s path and punishing those who helped him is the only element that doesn’t quite fit, holding onto a kind of Matrix darkness that the rest of the film is gleefully avoiding, and a number of the computer-generated visual effects backfire, but the film never loses its bounce and generally balances its humour and mayhem with an enjoyably even tone.

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