The Sandpiper

The SandpiperB

(out of 5)


Bohemian artist  (who despite the trappings is wonderful) has her idyllic life by the sea interrupted when her son, who she is trying to raise as a free-thinking nature boy, gets into serious trouble and is forced to attend a religious boarding school. The pastor who runs the place (, who cannot conceal how bored he is to be in this turkey) takes one look at her and is immediately smitten, trying to quell her fears of the narrow conformity her son will be indoctrinated into but, eventually, getting embroiled in an affair with her that betrays his marriage to his sensible and kind wife (, once again playing second banana to Liz after Raintree County). The beauty of these stars and the gorgeous scenery of Big Sur should make for an indulgent romance, with its poiltical subversiveness providing an extra treat: Taylor sees marriage as an excuse to enslave women, and is so unashamed of her liberal sexuality that when  tries to force himself upon her (if she’s willing to have a child out of wedlock than she must be loose), she comes at him with an axe.  Such delights turn out to be empty intellectualizing, she’s basically a free spirit because she throws late night picnics in caftans and doesn’t wear shoes, giving way quickly to gooey melodrama without reason or sense.  The whole thing is an empty experience that insultingly tries to pass itself off as brainy, the ripe symbolism of the titular bird just one of its laughable attempts at thoughtfulness.


,

USA, 1965

Directed by

Story by , adaptation by , , screenplay by ,

Cinematography by

Produced by Martin Ransohoff

Music by

Production Design by ,

Costume Design by

Film Editing by

Academy Awards 1965

Golden Globe Awards 1965


On the Set of "The Sandpiper"sandpiperliz

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