My Old Addiction

Movie Reviews By Bil Antoniou

45 Years (2015)

ANDREW HAIGH

Bil’s rating (out of 5):  BBBBBUnited Kingdom, 2015.  BFI Film Fund, British Film Institute, The Bureau, Creative England, Film 4, The Match Factory, National Lottery through UK Film Council.  Screenplay by Andrew Haigh, based on the short story In Another Story by .  Cinematography by .  Produced by .  Production Design by .  Costume Design by .  Film Editing by .  Academy Awards 2015.  Toronto International Film Festival 2015.  

Charlotte Rampling in 45 Years. Rampling was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress for her performance.

Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay have been happily married for, as the title suggests, forty-five years, and living in their idyllic Norfolk home, where the exciting part of the day is taking their dog for a walk across the gorgeous empty fields that make up the breathtaking landscape.  Coming up in a few days is a celebration party they have planned for their anniversary, originally to be thrown for their fortieth but pre-empted by Courtenay’s past health problems which are now settled.  When the post office brings a letter from continental Europe letting them know that the body of Courtenay’s girlfriend, a woman he dated before Rampling and who died in a skiing accident in the Alps, has been discovered frozen where she fell, it causes its own avalanche of revelations and realizations between what was previously a stable couple.  What is the meaning of a life spent together if one person is only there because their actual choice was taken away?  And what does it mean if that person insists that they are not unhappy with the way their life turned out?  Andrew Haigh’s brilliant, perfectly acted drama examines all these devastating, unsettling themes of longtime coupledom without ever letting it get contrived or melodramatic, instead detailing emotional devastation with the kind of detail that you usually get from reading an Iris Murdoch novel.  Rampling’s piercing eyes and Courtenay’s dumbfounded stares are enough to make bombs burst wordlessly in this gorgeous film, and the tension between them mounts so subtly until the gloriously elegant finale.  Also features a terrific supporting performance by the stunning .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: