Vanina Vanini

VaninaVaniniposterBB.5

(out of 5)


The odd political conversation between scenes of overripe romance remind one that this is the work of one of the architects of neo-realism, Roberto Rossellini. The rest of the time you’re awash in a dull love affair in one of the filmmaker’s least interesting films, as princess  finds herself madly in love with a “freemason” rebel (), one of the legions of fighters whose idealistic vision of a unified Italy would lead to the risorgimento. Milo is torn between her devotion to her class and her burning passion for the handsome stud, who makes her so crazy that she eventually goes out of her way to keep him and, in doing so, causes more harm than good. Produced on a giant scale with wonderfully plush sets and glittering costumes, the film’s pace is wooden and the dialogue tends to drone on, particularly when delivered by a shockingly dull Terzieff as the male lead. Milo is pure passion, poised and lovely in every scene and every inch the opposite of the fiery sex goddesses she portrayed in her famous Fellini roles, but her character barely jumps off the screen and all her efforts are lost in the shuffle.


Zebra Films, Orsay Films

Italy/France1961

Directed by 

Adaptation by , , Screenplay by Roberto Rossellini, , based on the short story Chronique Italienne by 

Cinematography by 

Produced by

Music by

Production Design by

Costume Design by ,

Film Editing by ,


VaninaVanini

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s