Bashing

BashingBBB

(out of 5)


It’s a pretty surreal society you’re living in when your peers punish you for being a survivor. After volunteering in Iraq and surviving being taken as a hostage, Yuko comes back to Japan only to find out that she has brought shame, not honour, to her fellow citizens. She is shunned by all, fired from her job, treated with threatening phone calls all day, and has to suffer the embarrassment of putting her family in a difficult situation when her father is also let go from his place of employment. She herself is proud of the work she did overseas; where she feels like just another person back home, in Iraq she felt special and needed. This terribly grim drama lacks for depth, but it is intelligent, well acted, and painfully realistic. We never get close enough to the characters, however, for it to hit us in a particularly emotional spot. Director Masahiro Kobayashi tells a very damning story about his culture but doesn’t give a thorough enough examination of what motivates this kind of treatment of someone who should be thought of as a hero; as a result the film leaves you wanting more.


Monkey Town Productions

Japan, 2005

Directed by

Screenplay by Masahiro Kobayashi

Cinematography by

Produced by Masahiro Kobayashi,

Music by Masahiro Kobayashi

Film Editing by

Cannes Film Festival 2005

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s