Le Samouraï

LeSamouraBBBBB

(out of 5)


This Jean-Pierre Melville masterpiece displays why  has been such an iconic figure in the cinema since he first burst forth as a matinee idol. He plays a lone wolf gun-for-hire who shoots a nightclub owner on assignment and is picked up by the police as a suspect for it. Having already planted an ironclad alibi with a sympathetic female (, at that point Alain’s wife), he is surprised to find that the club’s gorgeous pianist () is willing to help exonerate him despite the fact that she knows better. His desire to get to know this mysterious angel and get revenge on those who once hired him and now want to kill him is played against the cat-and-mouse game initiated when the intelligent head of police (, solid as ever) reveals that he doesn’t believe Delon’s alibi one bit. Gorgeous, muted colours shot to perfection by the great Henri Decae and scintillating direction by the masterful Melville make for one of the most impressive and stylish thrillers ever made. This movie pretty much runs on cool for fuel.


Compagnie Industrielle et Commerciale Cinématographique, Fida Cinematografica, Filmel, T.C. Productions

France/Italy, 1967

Directed by

Screenplay by Jean-Pierre Melville, , based on the novel The Ronin by

Cinematography by

Produced by

Music by

Production Design by

Film Editing by ,

The Criterion Collection

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