The Americanization Of Emily

The Americanization Of EmilyBBBB

(out of 5)


A comedy about D-Day? In Paddy Chayefsky’s brilliant screenplay, there is room made in cinema history for the one soldier who doesn’t want to be a war hero, and by God, is that man! He is excellent, in one of his very best film performances, as an American in England who doesn’t want to get his head blown off to save his country. , who never really can appear on screen without radiating gorgeous intelligence, turns in a fantastic performance in one of her first films as an army cab driver who is at first impressed with his idealistic, hands-off policy to war and then totally repulsed by it when things really get serious.  Like many period films made in the fifties and sixties, this film doesn’t make one whit of an effort to be historically accurate (check out the hairdos and outfits), but this doesn’t affect the quality of the experience.


USA, 1964

Directed by

Screenplay by , based on the novel by

Cinematography by

Produced by

Music by

Production Design by , ,

Costume Design by

Film Editing by


Cast Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Academy Award Nominations
Best Art Direction (Black-And-White) (art direction: George W. Davis, Hans Peters, Elliot Scott; set decoration: Henry Grace, Robert R. Benton)
Best Cinematography (Black-and-White) (Philip H. Lathrop)

British Academy Award Nomination
Best British Actress (Julie Andrews)


AmericanizationOfEmily

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