Half The Kingdom

BBB.5

(out of 5)


Jewish women, both orthodox and reform, take on the anti-feminist nature of their religion and come out swinging in this too-short but still rich documentary. Directors Roushell Goldstein and Francine Zuckerman interview a group of women who have all woken up to the patriarchal nature of their tradition but have decided to see it from a perspective in which they can continue to practice Judaism without accepting the second-class status they feel the religion accommodates. One woman sees the apex of her struggle in her decision to say kadosh for her father (which only men may do), another joins a group of women who go pray at the boys-only wailing wall (and inspires the film’s most unforgettable images of violent anger from the locals), and still another becomes a rabbi despite the fact that the job isn’t open to her sex. Even more important than the politically impressive content of this documentary is the director’s keen sense of showmanship: these ladies aren’t just rebellious, they’re also highly charismatic and personable, their on-camera interviews as entertaining as they are inspiring.


Canada, 1989

Directed by ,

Screenplay by , , Francine Zuckerman

Cinematography by

Produced by , Francine Zuckerman

Music by

Film Editing by Roushell Goldstein

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s