Wilde

BB.5

(out of 5)


According to director Brian Gilbert, Oscar Wilde never had a normal moment in his life–everything he says or does in this film is always perfectly spoken, perfectly lit and moved about at the pace of an oil painting. While the graphic sexuality and forthright attitude of the characters involved makes for the most progressive view of Wilde seen or read yet, the movie’s slow tempo and melodramatic mood don’t do much to inspire you.  is dull and annoying in the lead, while ‘s performance as Wilde’s longtime lover Lord Alfred Douglas (“Bosie”) is a little overdone but much more effective. The best performances come from  as Wilde’s long-suffering wife (though the script has her saying trite and overwritten dialogue as if she never in her marriage once asked her husband if he wanted a cup of tea) and ‘s too few moments as his dotty mother. Gilbert films underworld gay life in Victorian society like he was remaking Interview With The Vampire, and he never really tells us why this old dude who looks like Edith Evans borrowing Karen Carpenter’s hair can literally charm the pants off these hot young guys (I don’t care how successful his writing is); and speaking of hot young guys, there’s a wonderful little performance from a then little-known actor named .  You’re better off watching a good adaptation of the world Wilde created (The Importance of Being Earnest, for example) rather than a boring recreation of the one he inhabited.


Samuelson Productions, Dove International, NDF International, Pony Canyon, Pandora Films, Capitol Films, BBC Films, The Greenlight Fund

United Kingdom/Germany/Japan, 1997

Directed by

Screenplay by , based on the book by

Cinematography by

Produced by ,

Music by

Production Design by

Costume Design by 

Film Editing by

Golden Globe Awards 1997

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s