The Broken Tower

B

(out of 5)


 made this super low-budget tribute to poet Hart Crane as part of or inspired by his studies in English literature. He depicts key moments in the life of the modernist wordsmith: Crane had an erratic temperament and unabashedly loved the men in his life, making no apologies for his original style of writing before ending it by diving off a steamship and killing himself at the age of 32. Franco delivers long monologues of the artist’s work between fractured scenes of encounters with his mother (played by his real-life mother ) and his liaisons with his lovers.  The attempt to go post-modern on film does not work as well as it does on the page, and Franco merely rides the surface in this frustrating, often boring and mostly forgettable look at an unforgettable artist. It may not be possible to really know what made this guy tick, but it does not seem to matter much to the writer-director-star who is enjoying posing as a literary giant too much to probe beneath the surface.


,

USA, 2011

Directed by

Screenplay by James Franco, based on the book by

Cinematography by

Produced by , ,

Music by

Production Design by

Costume Design by

Film Editing by James Franco

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