The Golden Bowl

BB

(out of 5)


The least intelligent adaptation of a Henry James novel made so far is this latest piece by the team of Merchant Ivory (Howards End, The Remains of the Day), who have definitely seen better days.  is the penniless young woman traipsing around Europe who falls in love with an also impoverished Italian Count (, the worst piece of miscasting in a James film since Cybil Shepherd murdered Daisy Miller).  As their financial states don’t allow them to marry each other, Northam takes up with Thurman’s best friend (), and Thurman ends up betrothed to Beckinsale’s billionaire father (), but we’re never quite sure if she’s let her love for the prince burn away. The dramatic complications that ensue are never very interesting, and even  (in a disappointingly bad performance) looks a little bored having to referee it all from the sides as the friend whom everyone takes in as a confidante. The filmmakers have never made a more beautiful film—every scene has a new wonder of production design that rivals their best work—but nothing escapes the clear fact that the actors are all under-rehearsed and absolutely unsure of what they’re doing (when a great actress like Huston changes her accent in every scene you know something is wrong with the management). Thurman is strong but her character is too confusedly written to allow her to be in any way effective, and Beckinsale is never convincing as the Isabel Archer-like character (which Nicole Kidman did far better in The Portrait of a Lady) who has her world of innocence shattered in one fell swoop.


USA/France/United Kingdom, 2000

Directed by

Screenplay by , based on the novel by Henry James

Cinematography by

Produced by

Music by

Production Design by

Costume Design by

Film Editing by

Film Festivals:  Cannes 2000


Cast Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


GoldenBowl

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