Ripley’s Game

BBBB

(out of 5)


Years after he originally showed us his talents by killing and assimilating his best friend, Tom Ripley (, at the very peak of his slithering form) lives the high life in a beautifully restored villa situated in a tiny Italian hamlet. He has retired from his life of thievery and murder, but his past comes back to haunt him when a former contact () he screwed over for big cash arrives in search of a favour. Winstone wants Ripley to kill a business rival of his, but Ripley suggests a more innocent, unknown person would be better for the job, a local picture-framer () who is dying of leukemia, and Scott agrees to do the job because he figures the money would be good for his family. The job’s tasks multiply when Winstone shows up to employ Scott again in more assassinations, so now Ripley has to decide whether or not he will stay away from the situation completely or keep an innocent man from getting himself and possibly his family killed. Helping him would mean getting involved in some dirty business, but Mr. Ripley has always maintained his ability to stay above the mire no matter what the situation. The one thing he says he has learned is that we are “constantly being born”. An economical script and stylish direction by Liliana Cavani, director of the notorious The Night Porter, make for a marvelous adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s novel (previously filmed as The American Friend by Wim Wenders), one of a series featuring her devilishly likable protagonist. The character has gone from confused youth to debonair, icily exacting survivor, and the development is a fascinating and cinematically exciting one. has a terrific supporting role, and the cinematography is gorgeous.

Baby Films, Cattleya, Mr. Mudd

Italy/United Kingdom/USA, 2002

Directed by

Screenplay by , Liliana Cavani, based on the novel by

Cinematography by

Produced by Simon Bosanquet, , Riccardo Tozzi

Music by Ennio Morricone

Production Design by

Costume Design by ,

Film Editing by

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s