Ball Of Fire

BALLOFFIREposterBBBB.5

(out of 5)


 is a shy professor of linguistics who along with seven other equally isolated gentlemen is working on a brand-new, up-to-date dictionary thanks to a fund left behind by a late, wealthy benefactor. Upon researching an entry in the book he intends to devote to “slang” language, Cooper comes across snazzy club singer  and asks her for research help. She initially refuses, but when she finds she’s in a little trouble with the law thanks to some shady mobster connections, she immediately makes her way over to the mansion where the gentlemen live and work and moves in. These guys, having not set eyes upon a woman in decades, all go gaga over her, and before you can say Buzzbomb she’s turned their world upside down. None more so than Cooper, who has developed doe eyes for the lady who kisses him in order to teach him the meaning of the slang term “yum yum”. One of Stanwyck’s most energetic and appealing performances.


USA, 1941

Directed by

Screenplay by , , based on an original story by Billy Wilder, 

Cinematography by 

Produced by

Music by

Production Design by

Costume Design by

Film Editing by


Cast Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,, , , , , , , , ,


Academy Award Nominations
Best Actress (Barbara Stanwyck as “Sugarpuss O’Shea”)
Best Music (Music Score of a Dramatic Picture) (Alfred Newman)
Best Sound Recording (Samuel Goldwyn Studio Sound Department, Thomas T. Moulton, sound director)
Best Writing (Original Story) (Billy Wilder, Thomas Monroe)


BallOfFire

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